Episode 20 : The Rise of Virtual Nursing:

Betty Jo Rocchio and Tracy Breece, MSN, NI-BC, CPHIMS

Senior Vice President & System Chief Nursing Officer & Executive Director Nursing Informatics at Mercy

"Having a strategic plan on how technology can help us work smarter with the resources we have because we know we're not getting any more, and putting the right resources in the right spot, specifically with staffing, allows our nursing colleagues to be fulfilled, to do what they do best and take care of patients rather than be stressed and under pressure." - Tracy Breece

SCTS_Tracy Breece & Betty Jo Rocchio: Audio automatically transcribed by Sonix

SCTS_Tracy Breece & Betty Jo Rocchio: this mp3 audio file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Intro/Outro:
Welcome to the Smart Care Team Spotlight, presented by Care.ai, the Smart Care Facility platform company and leader in AI and ambient intelligence for healthcare. Join Molly McCarthy, former CNO of Microsoft, as she interviews the brightest minds in healthcare about the transformational promise of AI and ambient intelligence for care teams.

Molly McCarthy:
Too often, technology makes caregivers' lives harder, not easier. It's time for smart technology to empower care with a more human touch. I am delighted to have two special guests today on the Smart Care Team Spotlight, Betty Jo Rocchio and Tracy Breece. I'll go ahead and tell you a little bit more about each of them before we get into our conversation. Betty Jo has served as Mercy's senior vice president and chief nurse executive since October of 2020. Previously, she was the chief nursing optimization officer beginning in April 2018. Prior to joining Mercy in 2013, Betty Jo held several leadership positions in the Mount Carmel Health System in Columbus, Ohio. These include Chief Nurse Anesthetist System Director of Surgical Services, and Vice President of Nursing, and Chief Nursing Officer. Betty Jo has a passion and drive toward technology and analytics to assist nursing and clinical teams in patient care to drive optimal outcomes. She understands that collaboration in the industry, often outside of healthcare, produces unrivaled impact. Betty Jo is currently working on a nursing workforce strategy that includes matching patient demand and a gig nursing workforce with a modern, nurse-focused company that has the platform to support efficient and effective deployment. Welcome, Betty Jo.

Betty Jo Rocchio:
Hi, Molly! Nice to be here with all of you today.

Molly McCarthy:
Thank you. I'm going to tell you a little bit about Tracy too. Tracy Breece, a registered nurse, has over 25 years of experience in the hospital and healthcare system. Early in her career, as new technology developments were introduced into a nurse's daily life, Tracy quickly identified a natural affinity for connecting how technology is applied in the nurse's thought process. She embraced technology change, advocating for enhanced workflows. Some might have even called her an early adopter. Through countless implementations of multiple system-wide clinical technology products, her true north is the passion for improving the daily life of the nurse by freeing up time for nurses to do exactly what they do best: care for patients. Today, Tracy serves as the Executive Director for Nursing Informatics at Mercy. At the system level, she facilitates the integration of clinical, technical, operational, financial, and usability components of multiple information systems. Welcome, Tracy. It's great to have you here today.

Tracy Breece:
Thanks, Molly. I'm excited to share our story with your listeners.

Molly McCarthy:
Great! Really appreciate you taking time out of your very busy schedules right before the holidays. And I also wanted to share with our listeners that I personally had the opportunity to visit with Mercy and Saint Louis a little over a year ago and to see firsthand the amazing work that you are doing for nurses and patients across many different units. And more recently, I connected back with Tracy during the September NurseHack4Health, where your systems had two separate teams participate, and obviously, I love to see that, and I can attest to the fact that you're both eager to tackle old problems in new ways at your 40 hospital system across four states and 12,000 nurses. My first question, Betty Jo, I was recently reading your Day In The Life overview with Johnson and noticed that you continue to work in the OR twice a month, and I would love for you to share a little bit more about how working on the front lines inspires you as a leader and a change agent.

Betty Jo Rocchio:
Molly, for me, making system-wide decisions for nurses demands that I'm in contact with the front line, so I feel an obligation to not only continue my patient care but also stay up to date on the everyday problems that we experience at the front line. I enjoy it, I learn a lot, and I get a lot of information back while I'm working.

Molly McCarthy:
Great, thank you! Just a follow-up question. I also read that your work in the OR inspired the idea for Mercy Works on Demand, and I would love for you to share with our listeners about how you went about internally selling this concept and idea for the program and the value it brings to your workforce. And this question really is for both of you.

Betty Jo Rocchio:
Yeah! While I was spending time in the OR, we developed an inventory management system that reduced workload at the front lines for our nurses and the OR, and when I looked at the workload of especially our med surg nurses and inpatient nursing, it really started to inspire me to think about ways to reduce that workload. And you read Tracy and I's bio together, and you can see our synergy. You can see how we combine our passions because, at the very heart, we both are still nurses, and we feel their everyday struggle to not only deliver patient care, but exceptional service. And so she has a great skill set that fuels me, and she loves the vision that we set across Mercy. So we synergistically it came together and it's all driven off of serving the front lines.

Tracy Breece:
Betty Jo, I couldn't have said that any better. You're leadership and guidance through our Mercy System, understanding the reality of the workforce constraints, right? So knowing that when we show up to work every single day, we know for weeks and months that nurses were working short, and we knew that there was a supply and demand problem and that supply and demand problem is begging for technology solutions. So here we are, Molly, having a strategic plan on how technology can help us work smarter with the resources we have because we know we're not getting any more, and putting the right resources in the right spot, specifically with staffing, allows our nursing colleagues to be fulfilled, to do what they do best and take care of patients rather than be stressed and under pressure. And am I doing all the things that I need to do to fulfill not only what my patients deserve of me my employer deserves of me, but what I want to give my profession? And so Mercy works on demand, does just that allows us to pull a shift when we want to pull a shift, where we can pull the shift on the time that we need to pull it.

Betty Jo Rocchio:
Expanding on that just a little bit further when you take a look at how we're building our workforce. We went from 25% agency coming down off the pandemic to 8% agency, and the way we expanded it was through that flexible workforce layer. And so our core is coming up a little bit, Molly, but what you'll see is that flexible layer is filling in those hours that we need it where we need it the most. We know that productivity at the front lines isn't the same on a 12-hour shift, so launching the shifts that make the most amount of sense to help decrease workload at the front lines through an app-based product allows our nurses to choose, and it's really delivered great results at the front lines.

Molly McCarthy:
I love just stepping back and summarizing a lot of what you've talked about. First, just connecting, staying connected with the front lines. That was obvious to me when I was there a year and a half ago with you all, but I think that's so important, as you mentioned, Betty Jo, as a leader to stay connected, and we mentioned you are both still nurses, and I consider myself one as well, really looking to reduce burden, Tracy, as you mentioned, and putting your passions to great work. Congrats on dropping your agency use from 25 to 8%. That's amazing. The other thing that I heard through this program is just giving nurses the ability to choose, and I think that says a lot about your institutions and your leadership styles, especially in this day and age.

Betty Jo Rocchio:
Thank you! We appreciate it. And I just have to compliment Tracy on the way that she gets to the front line. She's not just engaged in nursing informatics; she's engaged in practice and using what she knows at the front lines. I, the nurses, continually, when I'm out rounding mention Tracy and the informatics team as being their support. And I think that's important because they're not seen as a ministry function, but they're seen as support at the front lines. And that, to me, really, just lights my soul on fire.

Molly McCarthy:
I think the other thing that I heard mentioned was you need to work smarter, Tracy, with the resources that you have. And one thing, my next question really will dig into this a little bit more. But when I came to visit you, you were really looking to maximize your investment in technology to minimize and automate administrative tasks for your bedside nurses and managers. So I would love for you all to share, for each of you to share some examples of what you've done with both bedside nurses and managers to really achieve that goal of maximizing technology, for example.

Tracy Breece:
Absolutely, I'm happy to start in this part of the conversation, because it's something that drove a passion in me at the start of understanding the problems, and Betty Jo just nicely outlined, being in the front lines means you actively listen. You are actively part of the team, and understanding how technology is either a catalyst for success or it's burdening the success of your daily work. And so, since you've last visited several things I'm excited to talk about, we have an innovation unit. That innovation unit is at Mercy Hospital, Saint Louis, and this is the unit that we are cultivating that spirit of evidence-based inquiry. We're cultivating the spirit of technology, early adopting of what's possible, working different in our lanes of daily work, and also supporting the entire care team with the patient at the center of the technology, and so that is absolutely new. We have expanded integrating hardware in the form of mobile solutions. So, Betty Jo, I really want you to talk about mobility and virtual nursing. Your vision is really going to transform and advance the science of nursing for not only Mercy, but the country. Let's talk about that a little bit.

Betty Jo Rocchio:
Tracy has set me up to talk about something that we are still in the early stages of, Molly, but we believe nursing derives their satisfaction with their profession, and that just love of patient care is by spending time at the bedside. It is not by documenting, it is not by trying to get into the EMR to see what has been going on. Nurses need to be by the patient's bedside, and the only way to do that is to make sure that they can document and see everything in that mobile solution. And in order to do that, those of us that work in the EMR daily know that it is set up in lanes, so there's a physician lane, a nursing lane, a lab lane, a pharmacy lane, and the nurse is really the one that spans across all those lanes. And so we are starting to take a look at the evidence around virtual nursing. And I know in this country we're hearing a ton about virtual nursing, but you're hearing about it, extracting people by the bedside, taking them out of patient care, and putting them in either a virtual place or a place off the unit to be able to take a look at delivering information and patient needs back to the nurse at the bedside. We are starting to look at AI and creating that virtual nurse brain. And so virtual nursing we believe, will be transformed by that augmented information, and we're creating a literal virtual nurse brain. And it is going to start delivering to the bedside with the very best evidence, those things that frontline nurse is going to need. So our concept of virtual nursing today is an actual nurse. We are starting to develop this technology, so it won't be, reducing workload on the nursing brain that's at the bedside by an AI-invested brain, and delivering what they might need so they can make critical decision-making at the bedside and stay by the patient's bedside. So it's, we're at the very early stages of this, but it's planned, and our innovation unit and Tracy is knee-deep in thinking about this with us because we have to do it correctly, but we know that the nurse is just going to be thrilled to have that information extracted out of the EMR directly onto their mobile secured phones, so they can make decisions and then interact with the EMR, either by ambient voice or by that mobile platform that we have.

Tracy Breece:
And Betty Jo, this parallel path that we've been on, right? We've been cleaning up everyday workflows and the environment of which we're working today, but also visioning and pulling our thought processes and our technology partners into a different lane with us. And Molly, we have framed this. When we socialize, and we talk about this work, we talk about it as Maslow's hierarchy of needs in order to get to the tippy top of self-actualization, utilizing generative AI, utilizing different levels of technology far beyond what we are using today, we have to have our basic needs met. And so for the last year since you've last visited, we have been working on our basic needs as well. We have reduced documentation burden. We're up to over 130 million clicks saved in our EHR. Our med surg nurses were spending upwards to 200 minutes in Epic, who is our partner for Electronic Medical Record, documenting the activities and patient care. We are now proud to say that we are nearly best in class for the worldwide Epic platform community around 123 minutes. So those elements of success that met, I call that Maslow's Foundation for our Technology journey for nursing. It is truly creating a highly usable environment with the software, the hardware, the thinking of newer technologies, and really focusing on human factors in advanced learning of our nurses. It is no secret to our nation that nursing informatics is a discipline that oftentimes folks are like, tell me a little bit about what you do, you're a nurse informaticist, tell me a little bit about that. And as Betty Jo and I have been talking, we are re-engineering the environment in which nurses work, and that's what a nurse informaticist does. We are an engineer, taking the nursing process and building technology into that, and excited to be on this new journey not only for Mercy, but the entire country, as technology is evolving.

Molly McCarthy:
It's great, I had there's a lot that I want to go back and pull back out for our listeners, but I'm going to start with what you just said, Tracy, because I know we've talked about this before, and I saw a post on LinkedIn more recently that you were at a conference where a PhD engineer student mentioned nursing as a Stem profession. And I think you said nurses who specialize in information technology are engineers and essential for healthcare systems in the quickly evolving digital technology era. And you talked a little bit about why that's so important, so you beat me to it. But thank you for bringing that up. And I think with the establishment of the innovation unit and really thinking about what's possible and supporting the care team and going mobile, that's amazing. I know it's more recent. And I'm just curious how you chose that, the particular unit or people or types of patients for that unit.

Tracy Breece:
That's a fantastic question. And I would say the hospital Senior Nurse, Chief Nursing Officer, was raising her hand saying, we are ready. We know technology can work better for us. We have a unit ready. I have a nurse leader ready. Certainly, it hasn't been perfect along the way. Originally thought we were going to do a three-bed part of a unit, and for reasons that we didn't know at the time, we're like, that's a great idea. We'll interview nurses. We did evidence-based literature to describe to us what is the foundation of an innovative nurse, what is the foundation of the thinking? And Betty Jo, I'm going to have you talk a little bit about how and why we expanded to the whole unit and why Mercy Hospital Saint Louis.

Betty Jo Rocchio:
We needed a big enough use case. To just do three beds, we thought, wouldn't give us a true test of everything we were putting in. And the other thing is, this is really coming from the front lines. It's not coming from Tracy, myself, or even the unit managers. The front lines are designing the workflow that they want and need in order to spend time with their patients, so they're really designing it, but we decided to do the whole unit. That way, we could get a bigger use case. And as you launch technology, it's really hard to launch in three beds rather than a whole unit. So as we were thinking through it and we started looking at their ideas, it naturally came to us that probably launching the whole unit would be a better choice.

Molly McCarthy:
That's amazing, I think. I love that. Going back to the front lines and really driving that, the workflow, because they know best, really, when they're with the patients 24/7. And I also just want to say congratulations on the reduced documentation burden. I know that's an overall goal for all of healthcare. So I think that's definitely going in the right direction. And to your point, earlier, nurses want to spend time with the patient at the bedside, not anywhere else. My next question, you touched upon, but I'm going to go back to it again. So my next question really was, when you think about rapidly evolving technologies and workflows like nursing care that you do now in terms of what you've seen in terms of return for your nurses who are supported through a virtual nurse, etc., especially for newer nurses coming in today being given assignments that are probably complex patients, I'm just curious if you have any stories around success with virtual nursing as it is today.

Tracy Breece:
We do, Molly, yes, and it's probably important for your listeners to know that our virtual nursing model is over ten years old. So we have a ten-year-old virtual nursing model. And with that, we have found that a virtual nurse has assisted in the very beginning of our journey. Alongside, our providers were looking for our critical care areas for decompensation models, right? So early, sepsis early. So Betty Jo, I'm going back, gosh, probably 15 years at Mercy. Early sepsis around decomposition or unrecognized sirs that would fall into full-blown sepsis. And so today, we have a very significant, robust example of how critical thinking and mining of our patient data can prove sepsis and surviving sepsis campaign. So that's one example, I think, Betty Jo, that comes to the top of my head just because our grassroots developed in sepsis with virtual nursing. I'm certain you have others as well.

Betty Jo Rocchio:
If you look at our V-Acue program in our ICUs, we do have nurses that are communicating at the front lines. They're looking, that's where we got the idea, really, for that virtual AI-assisted brain, Molly, because we're using nurses to identify in the EHR areas where a single nurse couldn't see. And so we know that nursing brain is fantastic in looking at some of those things. But with everything coming on, with all the technology, we know that AI is going to far surpass what our human brain can do. And so using what we've learned for ten years, augmenting it right in that generative AI is going to probably boost it by 100%. And then we can take some of that virtual nursing and use it to onboard some of our new student nurses and help in that way so they could be virtual preceptors. We believe there's still a spot, but it's probably not going to be the way that it looks today. So we're redefining that, the role, right? Just like we redefine the roles in ICU or med surg, we're redefining that virtual care model role, and I think it's going to shift a little bit.

Molly McCarthy:
Yeah, no, I agree. I think we're really just at the tip of the iceberg in terms of the human components and really the technological components of it. One other thing, this kind of leads into my last question that I loved when you were talking about the EMR has different lanes for the physician, for the nurse, for the pharmacist, whoever that caregiver is, and the nurse overlays all of them, or they, in theory, they do. I know that working as a nurse a long time ago, I used to think of myself with the patient kind of at the hub of a wheel and then outreaching as needed to whichever department I needed to consult with, if it was a radiology, pharmacy, physicians, etc.. So, really being that advocate. So with that concept in your mind, I would love for you to share with our listeners your vision for the future of nurses and nursing and smart care teams and really how nursing and our listeners can spearhead this collective effort, because I feel like it's so important that nurses are not just at the table, but leading it. And it, obviously, to me, it sounds like you are doing that, and I want to share a little bit more about your vision for where you are today and beyond.

Betty Jo Rocchio:
Tracy, why don't I lay the vision components? If you could layer on some detail because you're are so involved with the detail. But let me talk about why we started in med surg, and Molly, you know this. We have no shortage of filling our ICU positions, our ED positions today like we do med surg. The basic component behind why we started in med surg, we believe it's a workload issue, meaning it's not an acuity issue. There's a difference between acuity and workload. Acuity happens in the ED, it happens in the ICU. They have a couple of patients, but they go deep on that patient. That is actually less workload on the nursing brain than having 5 or 6 patients with multiple diagnoses, multiple needs, multiple friction. And you take those six patients and then overlay those lanes that we talked about, that workload is astronomical. And then if you get the wrong combination of patients, remember back to your nursing days when the wrong day would kill you more than actually the number of patients you had. You remember you were like, that was a horrific day. Why was it so bad? It was because you had to go wide and deep, and there were friction points in your day. So taking a look at med surg and redefining what that workflow looks like to take off some of that cognitive workload, that perception of workload we believe is going to bring some of the joy back to med surg nursing. It's the basis of all other nursing, and nobody wants to do it today. Think about nursing school, they have 1 or 2 patients, so they're going deep on 1 or 2 patients. And then we're like, here you go, let's be a med surg nurse, here's your six patients. Spam your face, right? Like you're not, your brain isn't trained for that, and I'm not so sure anybody's brain should be trained for that. But so we're redesigning each one of those lanes. And I'm going to lay out the lanes one at a time, Tracy. If you could just put a little color to it, let's talk about the start of a shift with bedside shift report. So we used to give report writing this little room where you used to talk about the handoff between the patients, what we were really doing, extracting information out of the EMR so the next nurse did not have to get it. Today, talk a little bit about what Epic has as far as the nursing brain and where we're doing report Tracy real quick, and then...

Tracy Breece:
Absolutely. So the future, imagine generative AI utilizing my mobile device that Epic serves up through the rover application. I hit a play button when the ED is sending me a patient, and I hit play on my phone. I'm holding it up to my ear, probably not any dissimilar to the recorders, Betty Jo, that you and I probably used way back when.

Betty Jo Rocchio:
Yep, yep.

Tracy Breece:
And so I'm mobile, and I hear everything synthesized in the medical record in a playback feature. Not only do I get that at Handoff, and Betty Jo, you're probably going to go through the work we're going to it's not going to stop there. So at that point in time, I know all the important details about my patient: age, chief complaint history, allergies, isolation, who is admitting what tests have been completed, and what still needs to be done. At that point in time, the computer that I'm touching is the mobile phone. That's where I'm getting all of the information, and I have a question. My patient's getting a blood transfusion that I'm receiving. I can stop what I'm doing, type it on my phone, and say, tell me a little bit more about the blood transfusion. How many more minutes does it have left? So I know immediately when that patient arrives to the phone floor, what I need to do all of this is utilizing technology. Okay.

Betty Jo Rocchio:
Thank you! Yeah, no, that's exactly it, and we're doing it at the bedside. So we're right there with the patient. We're not getting it on the phone, stopping, trying to talk on the phone; it's all coming there. And then we know exactly the next steps for that patient. And then just talk about the a little bit about the care model. So envisioning like rounding the next morning, right, rounding that occurs that nurses are too busy to go in with every doctor. Remember the days where we had time? We would go in with every physician and hear the report off, okay, today we want this patient's hemoglobin get to 11. We're going to give two units of blood, we're going to change this medication. I need that dressing changed, right, we're not healing. What they're really doing is setting the plan of care. Today, they do it. The nurse is off giving medications or doing something else, they don't have time to round with the physician. And we're going to have that virtual AI brain that's scanning that record and delivering up that plan of care based on all those lanes. And where's the plan of care? How's, Molly, do you remember care planning? Do you remember? I know I'm bringing up some... You're probably like, oh, I'm having flashbacks.

Molly McCarthy:
That, you're bringing up sensitive memories here.

Betty Jo Rocchio:
That care plan, and I hate to say it, and it's going to let the nurse educators are going to be slapping me on the wrist with a ruler, it's useless. It it always was useless, it was a good teaching tool, but it sits in a spot in the EHR that nurses don't even use it. We would go at the end of our shift the last thing, and try to update a care plan so we could check the joint commission. We're doing that. As we're documenting mobility throughout the day, we're going to have the plan of care or the care plan updated based on all those lanes. So the nurses are going to have to go back in and do it, and then that plan of care gets translated back into that bedside shift report that says the top three goals for this patient in the next 12 hours, right nurse Tracy, is these three things. And then you're going to document against that all day long for the next 12 hours, rewrite it back to the care plan, and then have it launch for the next 12 hours. That continuity across the EHR is going to be exciting, and then the nurse has a plan of care that's going to, by the way, come up on a digital whiteboard in the room for all to see, including the patient and family so they know the three goals for the day. We want mom to get up and walk to the bathroom today. They will know that's our goal. So they will reach out and call so we can make sure that we're documenting everything. So what else, Tracy? I know I missed a couple of details, but it's literally we're going to try to passively document as much as we can fill in the medical record so we can provide the care rather than the documentation.

Tracy Breece:
Absolutely, I think you touched on everything, the people and processes and our complex healthcare system and technology being that catalyst, Betty Jo, I think you've touched on everything that's important around where we're going. Molly, we know advancements in health technologies are coming quicker and faster than we can consume, but Betty Jo and I are here in our health system saying we want to be the first, we want to be out there, and we want to partner with our technology teams to enhance what has been known as interoperability features and leverage technology in a different way for that seamless communication that Betty Jo just talked to, talked through.

Betty Jo Rocchio:
And then, try all it in the innovation unit, because it sounds good talking about.

Molly McCarthy:
Correct.

Betty Jo Rocchio:
But when you launch it, it'll, there'll be some things to work out. So launching it in that one innovation unit, getting a full complete shift rollout and then into the next shift, and then launching across the ministry once we have the kinks worked out.

Tracy Breece:
Yeah! And nurses are working in non-traditional environments, Molly. We launched hospital at home, and why that initiative is important for us from a technology perspective is remote patient monitoring. And during COVID, we all had the ability to leverage technology around, okay, our patients are in their homes, we're sick. We don't know what it is that we're doing through this pandemic. Remote patient monitoring, really began generating some excitement. Where we're going is remote patient monitoring in our hospitals to continuously do the vital signs and that integration that Betty Jo just spoke to around the whiteboard. Here are your vital signs. Here's your blood pressure. These are the things of integrating the family around family-centered care that has been driven in clinical practice, in best practice standards, through evidence for so long. Technology is really laying a framework for us to do in a different way, and we're just thrilled and excited to be telling our story today.

Molly McCarthy:
I love it, I love your passion and your enthusiasm and to your point about including the patient and family, I think that's so important. I know myself as a healthcare consumer, I want to know if someone's taking my blood pressure or my pulse. Tell me what it is. Don't just go and chart it or write it down, let me know. And so having that information for the family is fantastic. And people want to know they are they have access to more data in every aspect of their lives. So to your point around using technology as a catalyst, I love that in combination with your people and processes. I do have one final parting question as we wrap up here. Unfortunately, we do have to wrap up. I know that I could talk to you guys all day. So our listeners are CNOs, CNIOs, and respective teams across the country, maybe world, hopefully, one day. But given each of your experiences in healthcare, I would love for you to each share a parting gift of wisdom with our listeners. Perhaps, what is your single most important practical piece of advice for them as it relates to their responsibility of being a tireless advocate for their patients and quite frankly, as leaders for your nurses? So I say one, but there's one for each of you. So, Betty Jo, if you want to go first.

Betty Jo Rocchio:
I would say never quit dreaming of a better world, being curious about the things that we think are not solvable, and applying the best evidence to make sure that we're doing the right things and we're not doing too many things because the focus really needs to be very narrow at this point on workforce practice, work environment, and workflows. If we're going to solve one problem, it's going to be that, and breaking that down into manageable pieces is going to be key.

Tracy Breece:
And in breaking down into manageable pieces, every hospital and health system, all processes can be improved. Embrace the roles of your nurse experts, those that are doing the work, those that have the insight into what needs to be improved and what can be improved. The role of a nurse informaticist is an enabler to help balance your workflows and your work environment for nurses. Nursing informatics specialists are workflow engineers. You heard me say it earlier in our discussion. We have a strong understanding of healthcare processes and workflows. We're implementing and integrating complex systems. Because of this, develop a team of nurse Informaticists to work alongside your nurses to actively listen, they will support your nursing strategic plan.

Molly McCarthy:
Wonderful! Thank you both so much for your time here today. I'm definitely hearing the work smarter, not necessarily harder, but I think with technology we can do that through that, the AI brain that you mentioned and just thinking about actionable insights, we shouldn't have to be delving through tons of information when we have technology that can bring it to the forefront for us. My last thing is I hope you guys will have me back soon. I would love to come see everything that you've done and I wish you all the best in the upcoming 2024 year. So thank you.

Betty Jo Rocchio:
Thank you, Molly.

Tracy Breece:
Thank you, Molly. And you bet, come back anytime, our doors are open.

Intro/Outro:
Thanks for listening to the Smart Care Team Spotlight. For best practices in AI and ambient intelligence, and ways your organization can help lead the era of smart care teams, visit us at VirtualNursing.com, and for information on the leading Smart Care Facility platform, visit Care.ai.

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